Monthly Archives: August 2008

Shiveluch, Russia

KVERT reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was slightly above background levels during 15-22 August. Analysis of satellite imagery revealed a thermal anomaly on the lava dome on 15, 18, and 21 August. The Level of Concern Color Code remained … Continue reading

Posted in Volcano Activity Reports | Tagged

Suwanose-Jima, Ryukyu Islands, Japan

Based on reports from JMA, the Tokyo VAAC reported explosions from Suwanose-jima during 24-26 August. Resultant plumes rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.4 km (6,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. during 25-26 August. Source: Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) – “Reports provided courtesy … Continue reading

Posted in Volcano Activity Reports | Tagged

Tungurahua, Ecuador

The IG reported that on 19 August fumarolic plumes from Tungurahua rose 20 m above the NE crater and on 20 August, steam-and-ash plumes rose about 50 m above the crater. On 21 August, intense rains prompted the Tungurahua Observatory … Continue reading

Posted in Volcano Activity Reports | Tagged

Random Order Eruptions!!

The weekly eruptions reports are normally listed in Alphabetical order – but because of this, Ubinas volcano is always on the top of the stats charts… and the other volcano’s have started to complain…   So this week, we’re going to … Continue reading

Posted in News

Rainfall induced pyroclastic flow

  The Montserrat Volcano Observatory (MVO) reported that: There was a rainfall-induced pyroclastic flow early on the morning of 25 August 2008. The wind direction was to the North at the time, and ashfall was reported from most of Montserrat. … Continue reading

Posted in News

How is lava made?

Just to keep things straight, geologists use the word “magma” for molten rock that is still underground, and the word “lava” for rock that has made it to the surface.   So, you want to know how magma is made? … Continue reading

Posted in FAQ

How long does it usualy take for lava to reach the surface of the Earth?

I’m not sure anyone knows this one for sure. It depends on what volcanoes you’re thinking about. For example, in 1980 at Mt. St. Helens, the first indication that magma (we call molten rock “magma” before it reaches the surface … Continue reading

Posted in FAQ

Is it hot near a lava flow?

It depends on how close you are, what kind of lava flow it is, and whether you are upwind or downwind. For example, the most approachable lava is pahoehoe. This is because each toe forms an insulating skin seconds after … Continue reading

Posted in FAQ

Why is under ground lava called magma and then when it comes up it’s called lava?

You’ve asked a good question. I guess it was just decided that it would help to keep things straight if there were two terms. They really are talking about the same stuff (molten rock). It is just easier this way. … Continue reading

Posted in FAQ

Can you supply the addresses of volcano observatories around the world?

The best place to obtain this information is from the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO). This is a multinational organization that serves many functions within the volcanological community. The WOVO web-site (www.wovo.org) has an on-line directory that should contain … Continue reading

Posted in FAQ